A World Livable for All

How about a world for everyone with no war, no hunger and a political system including everyone?

That’s more or less what the Barcelona Consensus is trying to create calling it a world livable for all. The basic document of the Consensus called Declaration 1.0 starts with the very true words: “The current global situation is unacceptable: it is structurally violent, Continue reading

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How to Live Green Without Freaking Out

I realize again and again how many people around me would like to live more environmentally conscious and responsible towards their surroundings.

That is why I put together the Kosmos 9 “Guide to Change” or in other words: Ten easy steps to succeed in moving towards how you would like to live your life. Continue reading

The Insatiable Hunger for Oil

Something even the outstanding band Radiohead speaks out against in public must be important, right? The tar sand project is showing just how big our need for oil is and how little we care about the environment.

if you are thinking: What were tar sands again? I will quickly explain you. Tar sands are a “mixture of sand, clay, water, and a dense and extremely viscous form of petroleum.” The largest quantities can be found in Venezuela and Canada. Since it is really hard to retrieve the oil from the sands it was not considered part of the oil reserves until recently. Since we are running low on oil the industry has reconsidered.

So good so far. Now, what is the problem with those sands? Continue reading

Grassrooting Health

Nathalie Jeremijenko runs an environmental health clinic. People get prescriptions not for medicine but on how to improve the world they live in.

The basic idea behind the environmental health clinic is to see how health is dependant on external local environments and how it can be improved by changing exactly that. How does it work? Continue reading

Water Footprint

How much water do you use every day? If you do not know, make a quick test provided by National Geographic and find out.

The water footprint calculator is part of the Freshwater Initiative which aims to preserve the fresh water reserves we still have on the planet.

According to the test, I use 4194 litres of water a day. In spite of scoring much lower than average, the result is rather shocking. Another test by waterfrootprint.org estimates I use 1295 litres per day, which still seems a lot. Just to make sure, I also did a third test. Waterfootprintkemira.com says my daily use is around 3300 litres per day.

How come I can use that much by myself? The answer is that Continue reading